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How Long Does a Tesla Battery Last?

How Long Does a Tesla Battery Last?

Range anxiety is one of the main concerns for potential electric car buyers. But the technology used in electric vehicles has improved by leaps and bounds since the introduction of the first EV.

Tesla has been at the forefront of this development, with most of its models having 300-400 miles of range.

But just how long does a Tesla battery last? Well, that will depend on some factors.

On average, Tesla owners can expect at least 267 miles of range on a single charge of their car’s battery. According to Tesla CEO Elon Musk, your Tesla batteries are supposed to last for 300,000 to 500,000 miles, or 1,500 battery cycles. That’s around 22 to 37 years for an average person.

There are talks about Tesla developing a battery that can last a million miles. But this will remain hearsay until batteries lasting a million miles are invented. You might also need a battery replacement during your car’s lifetime.

Each Tesla model battery lasting chart

Model S, Model 3, and Model X, and Model Y have different ranges after a full charge, and Tesla also adjusts the available mile range depending on driving conditions to make the most out of your car’s battery.

The range will still depend on your driving style and your battery capacity, but the longest-range Tesla model is the Model S at 375 miles per full charge.

So, a single full charge of Model 3 Standard can take you from Los Angeles to Las Vegas before needing a recharge. In comparison, Model S could take you almost halfway back before having to charge up somewhere near Flynn, California.

But no matter which model you choose, you’ll get enough range for your everyday commute and long road trips, thanks to Tesla Superchargers scattered throughout the country.

Tesla's battery warranty chart

There haven’t been many electric cars that have needed battery replacement, but according to Musk, a new battery for a Model 3 car can set you back around $5,000 to $7,000. These prices are expected to decrease once the cost of batteries themselves decreases.

Claims about people paying thousands of dollars for a new battery aren’t confirmed, and these talks just add to the conflicting information about battery replacement costs. But a Tesla battery can still go beyond 500,000 miles, just lesser mileage per charge.

Also keep in mind that recharging contributes to battery degradation and may affect battery life in the long run, especially if you charge from empty to full daily.

In fact, Tesla’s battery technology makes your electric vehicle more reliable over time, with studies suggesting that there is only a 10% decrease in performance after 160,000 miles. So, you can expect top performance from your car until then.

In the rare case that your batteries stop performing, don’t fret, as Tesla's battery degradation is covered by Tesla warranty. The warranty will depend on the model, but each warranty covers 8 years or 100,000 to 150,000 miles of range – whichever comes first.

To put things into perspective, you can drive your Model Y 15,000 miles a year or 41 miles a day within the 8-year warranty period. Meanwhile, Model X and Model S cars will take around 18,750 miles a year or 52 miles a day before their warranty lapses.

What charging options do I have when buying a Tesla

Tesla uses varying lithium-ion batteries on each model depending on its features. For Model X and Model S, a 100 kilowatt hour battery is used to allow them to store more power on a single charge.

Charging rate will depend on the EV charger that you use and your car model. Take the Model S for example, the Performance and Long Range Models are equipped with an 11.5 kilowatt hour onboard charger, which means a 60 kilowatt hour battery will take 6 hours to charge.

Just this year, Tesla stopped shipping wall chargers with their cars, so you’ll need to buy one separately.

There are Superchargers available to use for a fee. These can give you up to 200 miles of range in just 15 minutes of charging.

Just use these high speed chargers with caution as fast charging strains EV batteries and affects your car’s life in the long run.

Fortunately, a cost effective solution is the Level 1/Level 2 Tesla Charger by Lectron. It is equipped with interchangeable NEMA 5-15 and 14-50 plugs, allowing for 12 amp and 32 amp charging for your Tesla - letting you charge both at home and on the road.

Also, with charging stations like the Lectron V-BOX 40A and 48A, along with the Lectron J1772 to Tesla adapter, Tesla drivers have everything they need to fully charge their EV batteries overnight.

Fully charged Tesla compared to gas-powered cars

Tesla offers top-in-class range in electric vehicles and battery life. Compared to gas-powered cars, Teslas are much more expensive and can set you back anywhere from $40,000 - $125,000 depending on the model.

But how does your Tesla compare to traditional cars?

Here are the ranges of some of the most popular vehicles in the market:

  •   Audi A7: 463 miles
  •   Audi Q7: 450 miles
  •   BMW 330i: 468 miles
  •   Honda Accord: 488 miles
  •   Nissan Altima: 518 miles
  •   Toyota Corolla: 436 miles

Traditional vehicles generally have longer range (longer mileage) 0n one full tank versus one full charge of a Tesla. The Model S is the closest, this Tesla battery lasts 405 miles. But as electric vehicle battery technology advances, it won’t be long until EVs can compete or even surpass traditional cars in terms of range.

While the upfront cost may be more expensive, driving an electric car will save you more money in the long run as compared to traditional cars, especially these days when gas prices are astronomical.

For even more savings, solar panels are the way to go. Not only is the electricity free, they’re also a sustainable source of energy. It is possible that we may start seeing more integration between renewable energy industries, such as the EV industry and the solar industry.

How often do Tesla batteries need to be replaced

Your Tesla is due for a battery replacement once it has lost 20% of its range. Tesla owners reportedly only lose 5% after 100,000 miles.

Tesla CEO Elon Musk claimed in a Tweet that a Tesla battery can last between 300,000 to 500,000 miles. If you’re driving within the national average of 273 mile per week, expect your battery life to last anywhere from 21 to 35 years.

The point is a Tesla battery replacement will rarely (if ever) happen. There’s a higher chance you’ll need to replace your electric vehicle before you replace your battery.

How to look after Tesla battery

Long time smartphone users may already be familiar with decreasing battery health, and more frequent charge cycles. And this also happens with electric car batteries.

Unlike the lithium-ion batteries in your smartphone though, a replacement battery in your Tesla can cost you an arm and a leg.

Knowing how to take care of your batteries can help you save tons of money in the long run.

Here are a few tips on how to keep the battery capacity of your Tesla model in optimum condition and limit time between charge cycles:

Only use Superchargers when necessary

Fast charging produces more heat than the standard “slow” charging. Excessive heat causes degradation in lithium-ion batteries. Using Superchargers often may shorten the lifespan of Tesla vehicles and affect battery capacity.

Don't charge above 80% unless you need to

If you don’t need the battery’s full range, don’t consume it. For normal daily use, it’s advisable to charge to around 80% to 90% to maintain battery health. Also, avoid letting your battery charge fall below 20%.

Maintain a regular charging schedule

Maintain a charging habit. Consistency is the key. Keep a consistent charging schedule with a lower voltage home chargers and charging stations. Lower voltage charging won’t put too much strain on your batteries.

Drive more smoothly

Avoid sudden change in acceleration. Excessive acceleration for long periods drains out your battery abruptly. This can reduce your vehicle’s range and wear out the tires faster.

What else impacts Tesla battery ranges?

Your driving habits and environment can significantly impact both your battery range and battery life. According to Tesla, frequent stop-and-go driving, bad weather, and uphill driving can strain your battery and affect battery longevity and original capacity.

In bad weather conditions, your battery needs extra energy to maintain optimal operating temperature. Cold weather can also affect your car’s regenerative braking feature.

Maintaining your tire pressure can also help conserve range. So does a lighter cargo, as more weight requires more energy to move the vehicle.

The cost to replace Tesla Battery

Over the years, Tesla has used different lithium-ion battery configurations in its vehicles. There haven’t been many documented battery replacements, so it’s hard to come up with the price range. But the cost of the battery may range anywhere from $12,000 to $15,000. Labor costs are a different story but expect to shell out between $20,000 and $22,000 for battery replacement.

FAQs

How often does a Tesla battery need to be replaced?

There haven’t been many electric cars that needed battery replacement, but according to Elon Musk, your Tesla batteries last for 300,000 to 500,000 miles, or 1,500 battery cycles. That’s around 22 to 37 years for someone driving an average of 40 miles a day.

How much does it cost to replace a Tesla battery?

Musk claims that a new battery for a Model 3 car can set you back around $5,000 to $7,000. That’s exclusive of labor costs. These prices are expected to decrease once the cost of batteries themselves decreases. Expect to spend between $20,000 and $22,000 for battery replacement.

How quickly do Teslas charge?

This will depend on the Tesla model and the charger you’re using. Tesla models have varying ranges, and therefore, varying charging time (a bigger battery will also take longer to charge).

What happens if Tesla runs out of battery?

The short and simple answer is the car will stop and you’ll need a towing service to take your car to the nearest charging station. Your Tesla will warn you about low battery, so don’t worry about suddenly running out of juice mid-drive.

How far can a Tesla go on one charge at 70 mph?

InsideEV’s 70 mph test got 310 miles of range on one charge of a 2021 Tesla Model 3 AWD; 43 miles short of its claimed range of 353 miles. The 2021 Model S Plaid with 21” wheels recorded 300 miles for one full charge, 48 miles lesser than its advertised range.

What is the range a Tesla has after one charge?

A standard model Tesla can get at least 267 miles of range for a single charge. However, the Model S Long Range can go an estimated 375 miles.

 How do I charge my Tesla?

It’s advisable to charge your Tesla vehicles to around 80% to 90% to maintain battery health. Also, avoid letting your battery charge fall below 20%.

How do I check if the battery on a used Tesla is still good?

Tracking a Tesla's mileage and battery capacity over time is the easiest way to check battery life. It’s due for a battery replacement once it has lost 20% of its range. Tesla owners reportedly only lose 5% after 100,000 miles.

Is battery degradation a consideration when buying a used Tesla?

Tesla’s battery technology makes your electric vehicle more reliable over time, with studies suggesting that there is only a 10% decrease in performance after 160,000 miles. So, you can expect top performance from your car until then. In case your battery stops performing, a battery warranty covers 8 years or 100,000 to 150,000 miles of range – whichever comes first.

Do different Tesla models have different batteries?

Tesla uses lithium-ion batteries in all its vehicles, but they’re not all the same. There are four main types of batteries across their EVs: 18650-type, 2170-type, 4680-type, and the prismatic-type Tesla battery.

What is the lifespan of a Tesla battery?

Just how long does a Tesla battery last you ask? Tesla car batteries can last for 300,000 to 500,000 miles, or 1,500 battery cycles. That’s around 22 to 37 years if you’re driving 40 miles per day.

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