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How Long Does it Take to Charge an Ioniq 5?

How Long Does it Take to Charge an Ioniq 5?

Buying an electric car is a big move for drivers who are used to traditional gas-powered vehicles. Probably the top concern for buyers is charging. Charging stations can be few and far between in some areas, as opposed to gas stations that are just everywhere.

Different car manufacturers offer varying charging speeds depending on the model. Hyundai has upped the game this year with the introduction of the 2022 Hyundai Ioniq 5. The SUV promises top-of-class charging speeds that can give an electric vehicle battery a full charge within minutes.

Hyundai IONIQ 5 Key Stats

The new Hyundai Ioniq 5 comes in two versions: the Long Range Battery (72.6 kWh) and the Standard Range Battery (58 kWh). Both feature impressive charging speeds of up to 350 kW. It’s available in rear- or all-wheel drive variants, boasting between 168 and 320 horsepower.

The ranges of these variants depend on the battery life and drivetrain. The standard range has around 220 miles of range. The All-Wheel Drive (AWD) Long Range variant has 256 miles of range while the Rear-Wheel Drive (RWD) has a 303-mile range.

On top of all this, the Ioniq supports both 400-volt and 800-volt DC fast chargers for one of the fastest electric car battery charging systems on the market.

Charging Details

The Ioniq 5 comes with a portable charging cable for Level 1 charging. Default charging is at 6 amps, but it can be adjusted to 12 amps – good if you don't want to overload the outlet. Don’t expect too much with a standard 120v's charging speed as you’ll only get 3-5 miles per hour. It could be enough for topping up for daily commutes. But going from 0 to 100% will take days.

Ioniq has a 10.9 kw on-board charger, which you can only optimize with a 240v outlet. It uses the Combined Charging System (CCS) inlet with the top portion used for Level 2 home charging sessions. The base model Ioniq 5 SE Standard Range is a RWD with a 58-kWh battery capacity. With a 220-mile range, a full charge will take about six hours.

But what Hyundai boasts is the electric vehicle’s DC fast charging capabilities. With a 350-kWh charger, the Ioniq 5 Long Range AWD will charge from 10% to 80% in just 18 minutes. That’s around 179 miles of range with an 800-volt DC charger. Check your nearest charging station if it supports 800-volt charging.

Connector type and charging rates

Out of the box, the Ioniq 5 has a portable charging cable included. This can give your car around 3-5 miles per hour, which while slow could be enough for daily battery top-ups for short commutes. A full charge can take days, depending on the State of Charge (SoC) of your electric vehicle. The Standard Range battery can take up to 74 hours to be fully charged.

There are two types of Level 2 home charging stations available: the plugged-in and hardwired. Plugged-in EV chargers are limited to 40-amp charging (9.6kw) which translates to around 25-30 miles per hour. But with Ioniq’s 10.6 kw on-board chargers, you’ll need hardwired chargers to fully utilize it. 48-amps allow you to charge faster, giving you 30-33 miles per hour.

DC fast charging is where Hyundai raised the bar. Ioniq 5 was built on the Electric Global Modular Platform (e-GMP), which makes the 800-volt battery system possible (most electric vehicles use the 400-volt system). Using a 350-kWh ultra fast charger, Ioniq 5 Long Range AWD has a maximum charging rate of 10% to 80% in 18 minutes. That’s about 68 miles in just 5 minutes!

Meanwhile, the Standard Range battery going from 10% to 80% at 38.5 kWh added 154 miles of range using the 400-volt DC charging.

Where you can charge a Hyundai IONIQ 5

For most electric vehicle owners, charging is done at home. The portable charging cable that comes with your Ioniq 5 can be plugged into your standard 3-pin outlet at home.

If you want optimal charging for your EV, Level 2 charging is the way to go. Ioniq uses the CCS inlet, with the top portion used for Type 2 connectors. You can either purchase a plug-in charger from third party manufacturers like Lectron or have one hardwired to your house.

But you can always find public chargers in parking spaces, malls, supermarkets, and offices. Consider joining charging networks in your area for better deals and hassle-free charging sessions.

Hyundai has partnered with Electrify America to give two years of free unlimited 30-minute DC charging sessions when you purchase or lease an Ioniq 5. This 30-minute complimentary access can give you at least 80% of battery per charge.

To check for a nearby Electrify America DC fast charging station, use the Electrify America app and make sure to filter by connector as the Ioniq 5 uses a CCS connector.

Hyundai Ioniq 5 Battery Options

The 2022 Hyundai Ioniq 5 comes in two versions: the Long Range Battery (72.6 kWh) and the Standard Range Battery (58 kWh). The base model SE Standard Range is a rear-wheel drive (RWD) compact SUV with a 220-mile range on a full charge. It can go from 10% to 100% in about six hours using a Level 2 charger plugged into a 240-volt outlet.

The longer-range SE, SEL, and Limited trim levels offer even more power and are available in RWD and all-wheel drive (AWD) versions. The RWD has an estimated range of 303 miles, while the AWD model has 256 miles on a full charge.

Vehicle-to-Load Feature

Another one of Hyundai's innovations is the Vehicle-to-load (V2L) feature which allows Ioniq 5 owners the ability to offload power from their electric cars to power-up other electric devices. This technology turns your vehicle into a charging station and is great when you’re outdoor and need to power phones, laptops, lamps, or even other EVs.

An on-board power converter uses the battery’s stored energy to provide up to 3.6-kilowatts (kW) of electricity. The V2L feature can only be used when the car is on, but you can buy a V2L adapter from Hyundai dealers to offload power even when it’s off.

The Hyundai IONIQ 5 Charging Time by Method

The 2022 Hyundai Ioniq 5 comes with an on-board AC charger that can be connected to a standard 240-volt home outlet. But it can also be charged in 800v rapid charging stations that have been popping up across America. Ioniq 5 is only one of the few electric vehicles that can handle such powerful charging. It can go from 10% to 80% in just 18 minutes when plugged into one of these chargers.

Here are the estimated charging times by method:

  •   Level 2 240V AC Home Charging – 10% to 100% in 6 hours 43 minutes
  •   400V DC Public Charging – 10% to 80% in 25 minutes
  •   800V DC Fast Charging – 10% to 80% in 18 minutes, 68 miles of range in just 5 minutes

A complimentary two years of free unlimited 30-minute DC charging in any Electrify America public charging station comes in your purchase or lease of the vehicle.

FAQs

How Long Does It Take to Charge the Hyundai Ioniq 5?

Charging speed of the Hyundai Ioniq 5 will depend on what version you have and the method you’re using. The Standard Range model with a 58-kWh battery can go from 10% to 100% in about six hours using a Level 2 charger plugged into a 240-volt outlet. A 400-volt DC Public Charging can charge your car from 10% to 80% in 25 minutes, while an 800-volt DC Charging can do charge from 10% to 80% in just 18 minutes, or 68 miles in just five minutes. Just check if the charging station near you supports ultra fast charging.

How fast does Hyundai Ioniq 5 charge?

Using the portable charging cable included in your purchase, expect around 3-5 miles of range per hour, which could be enough for daily battery top-ups for short commutes. With a third-party Level 2 charger, you can get around 25-33 miles of range per hour of charging session. But when connected to a 350-volt DC fast charger, can go from 10% to 80% in just 18 minutes

How long does it take to fully charge the Ioniq 5 from a standard 240-volt outlet?

The Standard Range model with a 58-kWh battery can go from 10% to 100% in about 6 hours using a Level 2 charger plugged into a 240-volt outlet.

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